Book Review: Six Pixels of Separation

Let me start off by saying that reading and I have had a rocky relationship. I remember when I was younger getting hauled to the library with my three other siblings. They would be taking home piles of books while I would take home one or two which I wouldn’t end up finishing. Reading was exhausting for me back then. My already imaginative mind did not need books to come alive. I found it a tedious endeavour and didn’t see the point.

Fast forward to today and things have totally changed. I find reading useful for a variety of different reasons. It helps you become a better writer, allows you to pass gaps in downtime, and of course helps you learn about something new. I also think as a professional it is important to read books pertaining to your field, allowing you to gain new insight and perspective. One book which fits this description is Mitch Joel’s Six Pixels of Separation, the first book I read this year.

Six Pixels of Separation, with the title borrowed from but not to be confused with Six Degrees of Separation (I confused them a lot when describing this book my friends), is a book about the value of getting online and connecting yourself to the online community so that you can better position yourself as an individual or business. Joel shares that by leveraging the internet to your benefit, primarily through blogging and social networking, you can make new connections, find your niche, and ultimately build your own unique personal brand of who you are and share it with the world.

A quick read at only 270 odd pages due to the simple conversational language Joel uses, Six Pixels of Separation explains that making your presence online, for example by blogging,  is more than just writing entries (text). It is also about audio (podcasts) and video. Joel encourages you that when you are starting to develop your presence online, to not just limit yourself to text but to use these other ways of connect as well.

Since the relaunch of my blog, Six Pixels of Separation is exactly the book that I needed to read. It tells you how to get started, get connecting, and just plain get out there and get acquainted with the tools and people to help propel yourself forward as an individual or business. Six Pixels of Separation is about going beyond your geographical boundaries and exploring online where you can find resources to advance yourself as an individual or as a business.

This is perhaps the most compelling part of the book, using it as a resource. There are a variety of interesting case studies (I do enjoy case studies very much so) of men and women who were able to leverage the internet to create a niche for themselves. Using my memo pad, as I wrote about here, I was able to come jot down the names of these creative people in PR, marketing, and communications, to check out on Twitter (Mine is @FFasoyinu if you don’t have me already) as I went along in Six Pixels of Separation to do further research on later.

Overall, Mitch Joel’s Six Pixels of Separation, was an interesting read for me. It really got my mind going in the direction that I wanted to go deeper in in 2011 in regards to entrepreneurship, finding a niche, and developing my personal brand. Couldn’t have been a better match for me and my book to start the year. I think I’m going to enjoy this book review thing.

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3 thoughts on “Book Review: Six Pixels of Separation

  1. Wow – what can I say, but “thank you!” I often tell people that buying a book is easy… it’s reading it and doing something with the content that is the hard part (which you echoed in your post). I’m actually working on book #2 right now, so let’s keep our finger’s crossed that it all happens soon.

    Thanks again… I really do appreciate the kind words!

  2. I just wanted to say thank you for introducing me to this book. This book has really influenced the way in which I view the world of social media and the future of how people connect and interact with each other. In my opinion, it is a must-read for anyone that wants to embrace the new age of communication.

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